ARCS Measurement

CIS & IMMS

Two integral parts of the ARCS model are the measurements that were developed and have been used in numerous research studies. One of them, the Course Interest Survey (CIS), is designed for instructor-led settings, whether face-to-face or virtual. The other one, the Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS), is as the name suggests for use with self-directed learning materials. These could be the materials used within a class room, stand alone print materials, or online materials. These tools have been proved to have good internal consistency (reliability) and validity. They, together with psychometric and scoring information are available in my book and may be used free of charge with permission.

 

Following is a sampling of studies that have used one or the other of these instruments. I have not done a rigorous search of the literature to find other example, so if you know of any and will send the reference information to me, I will add them to this list.

Babe, T. S. (1995). The validation of relevance as an independent dimension of the arcs motivational model of instructional design. The Pennsylvania State University.  

 

Chang, M. M. (2001). Effects of embedded relevance enhancement within a computer based interactive multimedia program for English as a foreign language learners. Ph.D., Purdue University.  

 

Gabrielle, D. M. (2003). The effects of technology-mediated instructional strategies on motivation, performance, and self-directed learning. Ph.D., The Florida State University.  

 

Hirdes, B. A. P. (2004). The role of motivational design in health education: an examination of computer-based education on women, smoking and health. Ph.D., Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto.  

 

Ley, K. (1989). The effects of attitude modeling and skill modeling on learner instructional motivation. Ph.D., The Florida State University.  

 

Moore, J. E., Burke, L. A., & Baldwin, T. T. (1996). The paradox of teaching management to undergraduates: A new model and empirical findings. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University School of Business.

 

Naime-Diffenbach, B. (1991). Validation of attention and confidence as independent components of the ARCS motivational model. Ph.D. doctoral dissertation, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL.  

 

Nwagbara, C. I. (1993). Effects of embedded relevance enhancement within a computer based interactive multimedia program for English as a foreign language learners. Ph.S., Purdue University.  

 

Venezuela, E. J. (2003). The Effect of Incorporating Interactive Concept Maps on Non-Major Adult Students' Attitudes and Motivation  Toward a Web-Supported Biology Course Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University